Tag Archives: mindfulness in schools project

Day Workshop on Mindfulness for Educational and Child Psychologists and those working in schools: an update

Work with children includes using drawings to help them to express their experiences of mindfulness.  Here a child drew how he felt relaxed and comfortable all over his body.

Work with children includes using drawings to help them to express their experiences of mindfulness. Here a child drew how he felt relaxed and comfortable all over his body.

Educational and Child Psychologists have an essential role in schools and work with school staff, families, children and young people.  They apply psychology in a range of educational contexts to help children and young people make progress with learning.

Difficulties with learning may be due to factors that cannot be changed, such as autism or medical needs.  However, they may be also due to factors can be changed – such as the ability to pay attention and regulate emotions. Substantial research evidence shows that mindfulness, a form of training in body-mind integration, can help improve attention, learning potential, working memory capacity and mental health and wellbeing.  Those working in schools can help children and young people become  better able to manage difficult feelings, such as anger, anxiety and low mood.

This workshop is an opportunity for educational and child psychologists and others working in schools to learn about mindfulness and how it can be used as an intervention in schools.  It provides a theoretical and practical overview of mindfulness, including the research evidence for its benefits.  It gives an insight into how mindfulness training may be adapted for those with Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) and includes information on the Mindfulness-based Awareness Training (MBAT) intervention that was developed through doctoral research. Though training and support on how to integrate mindfulness into their lives, children and young people can enhance their potential to pay attention and learn.

To learn more about this and to attend a workshop, click here or contact me by email.

Best wishes, Bernadette

How can mindfulness be adapted for different populations?

Chris Cullen from the Oxford Mindfulness Centre and Mindfulness in Schools Project.  He presented the workshop for the Exeter Mindfulness Network.

Chris Cullen from the Oxford Mindfulness Centre and Mindfulness in Schools Project. He presented the workshop for the Exeter Mindfulness Network.

On 12 June, Chris Cullen, from the Mindfulness in Schools Project and Oxford Mindfulness Centre gave a workshop by the Exeter Mindfulness Network, University on “Adapting mindfulness for different populations”.

I was inspired.  Here was a clear way to make mindfulness accessible to those with a range of needs, from young people to those in highly stressful work situations, while maintaining the essential integrity of the programme. The key message: follow the structure of the well-researched, tried and tested Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy programme.

The workshop was designed for those with training and experience in teaching mindfulness, following the Good Practice guidelines for teaching mindfulness-based courses.  While MBCT was designed for preventing relapse into depression, with care and consideration, it can be made applicable to a much wider audience, including the general population itself, and maintain its essential integrity.

When considering how to adapt MBCT, the first step is to bring to mind are the core intentions of the programme itself and to ensure that the teaching is orientated towards these throughout.  Then, bearing in mind the particular needs of the target group, the theoretical and practical reasons for making the changes are considered. Essentially, the training aims to empower the participants with mindfulness-based skills to better manage “crux” moments in their lives.  These are times when mindfulness skills are drawn upon to respond rather than react, to make ‘wise’ choices, rather get drawn into automatic, habitual patterns of thinking, feeling and behaving.

Finding Peace in a Frantic World - a book by Mark Williams and Danny Penman, which is a newly developed 8-week course.

Finding Peace in a Frantic World – a book by Mark Williams and Danny Penman, which is a newly developed 8-week course.

These steps are key to the process of developing a well-structured mindfulness programme for a range of populations and needs, and it has been tried and tested in the development of the  “.b” (dot-b) programme for teens by the Mindfulness in Schools Project and the Peace in a Frantic World course for in the general population wanting to enhance resilience to stress and promote well-being.

The workshop was run by the Exeter Mindfulness Network and held at the University of Exeter.

The workshop was run by the Exeter Mindfulness Network and held at the University of Exeter.